Dekalb County Soil and Water Conservation District

Needs Assessment

Cost Share Program

The Soil and Water Districts Commission has developed the cost-share program to provide financial assistance to help farmers and landowners install erosion-control practices. The program has helped conserve and assure the continued productivity of Missouri’s soil and water resources, saving an estimated 137 million tons of soil.

Funds for the program come from the one-tenth-of-one-percent parks, soils and water sales tax approved by voters and is administered by local soil and water conservation districts.

The cost-share program provides in excess of $20 million annually to Missouri landowners. Approximately 6,000 practices are completed each year on agricultural land to reduce or abate soil erosion. A variety of practices are eligible to treat highly erodible cropland. /p>

Common Cost Share Practices in DeKalb County

Grazing Management: In pastureland where non-woody, permanent vegetative cover is established.  The reason taxpayer dollars are spent on this concern is to promote economically and environmentally sound agricultural land management on pastureland by demonstrating the best use of soil and water resources through the use of rotational grazing as well as the reduction or prevention of soil erosion and water quality protection.  DeKalb County offers the following practices

Sensitive Areas: A strip or area of vegetation along one end of a field, surrounding a field or alongside a stream.  The reason taxpayer dollars are spent on this concern is for the protection of water quality through buffers collecting and filtering out sediment and other nutrients, herbicides and pesticides that could runoff of crop fields, and the exclusion of livestock from streams keeps them from defecating in the streams preventing high nutrient and E. coli content while protecting the streambank from soil degradation at the same time.  The practices are measured by the total number of acres in the field.  DeKalb County offers the following practices:

Sheet and Rill Erosion: The removal of layers of soil from the land surface by the action of rainfall and runoff.  It is the first stage in water erosion.  The reason taxpayer dollars are spent on this concern is  protecting the soil from runoff stops potential land degradation and assists with water quality protection.  DeKalb County offers the following practices to control this type of erosion:

Gully Erosion: The process whereby the removal of soil is characterized by large incised channels in the landscape; sever erosion in which trenches are cut into the soil.  The reason taxpayer dollars are spent on this concern is protecting the soil from runoff stops potential land degradation and assists with water quality protection.  These practices are measured by the number of actively eroding gully sites. DeKalb County offers the following practices:

Woodland Erosion: The process whereby the removal of soil or vegetation (including trees) through animal presence or tree harvesting allows soil to become susceptible to sheet and rill and gully erosion.  The reason taxpayer dollars are spent on this concern is to exclude livestock, people or vehicles from the woodland area and to develop a plan for harvesting trees in an appropriate manner to protect soil integrity and water quality.  DeKalb County offers the following practice:

Groundwater Protection: Water beneath the earth’s surface fills pores between materials such as sand, soil or gravel.  Groundwater is a major source of water for agricultural and industrial purposes and is an important source of drinking water.  The reason taxpayer dollars are spent on this concern is for the protection of soil and water quality.  DeKalb County offers the following practices:

Nutrient Management: To demonstrate the environmental and economic advantages of following a nutrient management plan, and to provide operators an incentive to adopt new management techniques and /or technologies for applying commercial fertilizer.  The reason taxpayer dollars are spent on this concern is water quality.  If nutrients in the soil or the ones that are applied are managed to the point of the best and appropriate use, there will be less nutrient runoff and leeching of the soil after a rainfall event into the streams.  DeKalb County offers the following practice:

Pest Management: To demonstrate the benefits of applying the correct amount and type of pesticides so operators minimize entry of contaminants to ground and surface water.  The reason taxpayer dollars are spent on this concern is to protect water quality by reducing the mount of pesticides used on cropland or pasture that could potentially runoff and contaminate a stream or other water sources.  DeKalb County offers the following practice: